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SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com
SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com
SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com
September 23, 2018 9:10 pm EST
Location: 33.436N 77.743W
Wind Dir: E (80°)
Wind Speed: 8 knots
Wind Gust: 10 knots
AT Ps: 30.10 in (1019.2 mb)
Air Temp: 81°F (27.1°C)
Dew Point: 73°F (22.5°C)
Water Temp: 82°F (27.6°C)

SaltwaterCentral - Quit Fishing ~ Start Catching - SaltwaterCentral.Com


On July 4, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission invites anglers and would-be anglers of all ages to go fishing — for free. From 12 a.m. until 11:59 p.m., everyone in North Carolina — resident and non-residents alike — can fish in any public body of water, including coastal waters, without purchasing a fishing license or additional trout fishing privilege. 

Although no fishing license is required, all other fishing regulations apply, such as length and daily possession limits, as well as bait and tackle restrictions.

To give anglers a better chance of catching fish, the Commission stocks a variety of fish in waters across the state — including trout and channel catfish. The agency also provides access to fishing sites across the state, including public fishing areas and boating access areas. The interactive fishing and boating maps on the Commission’s website list more than 500 fishing and boating areas, many of which are free, that are open to the public.

Started in 1994, free fishing day is an annual tradition, sponsored by the Commission and authorized by the N.C. General Assembly. It always falls on July 4.

On all other days of the year, a fishing license is not required for anglers 15 years and younger, but anyone age 16 and older must have a fishing license to fish in any public water in North Carolina, including coastal waters. 

For more information on fishing in public, inland waters, visit the Fishing page.

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