Council to Hold Series of Public Scoping Meetings in February

Council to Hold Series of Public Scoping Meetings in February
Topics include allocations, Annual Catch Limits, Limited Access Privilege Programs, and mackerel quotas
 
From Marathon to Manteo, fishermen who fish in federal waters along the South Atlantic coast should plan to attend one of a series of public scoping meetings/workshops being held by the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council in February.  These informal scoping meetings/workshops provide the public an opportunity to weigh in on several fisheries issues before the Council determines if management actions are warranted.
 
These issues include options for determining allocations of fisheries between recreational and commercial sectors, as well as allocations within these sectors.  For example, recreational allocations may be considered between for-hire (charter and headboats) and private recreational fishermen.  For the commercial sector, allocations may be considered based on gear types.  Other issues open for scoping include possible amendments to the Snapper Grouper Fishery Management Plan that will establish Annual Catch Limits for species undergoing overfishing as outlined in the reauthorized Magnuson Stevens Act.  These ACLs may lead to further restrictions on certain fisheries.  Additionally, the Council is soliciting public comment on the establishment of a Limited Access Privilege Program for the commercial snapper grouper fishery as well as input on the allocation of the commercial Atlantic king mackerel quota. 
 
While the Council has held public scoping meetings in the past, this series is unique in that several members of the Council staff and local Council representatives will be on hand to hold informal round table discussions in a workshop format, answer questions, and provide participants with information regarding the scoping topics and other issues addressed by the Council.  The meetings/workshops will be open from 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM and again from 6:00 PM until 8:00 PM.  Council staff and members will be available during these hours for informal discussions and members of the public can provide formal comments for Council consideration during these time periods. 
 
The Council is also accepting written comments on these issues until5:00 p.m. on February 22, 2008.  Copies of the public scoping documents with details on how to submit written comments on each topic are available by contacting the Council office and will be posted on the Council’s web site at www.safmc.net as they become available.  The scoping documents contain additional background information on these individual issues and will be helpful in preparing for the scoping meetings. 
 
The public is encouraged to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn first hand about current federal fisheries issues, discuss details with Council members and staff, and provide comments.  The information and recommendations provided by the public will be instrumental in determining the future course of fishery management decisions. 
 
 
South Atlantic Fishery Management Council
Public Scoping Meeting Dates and Locations
 
 
Monday, February 4, 2008
The Mutiny Hotel
2951 South Bayshore Drive
Coconut Grove, Florida  33133
Phone: 305-441-2100
 
Tuesday, February 5, 2008
Radisson Resort at the Port
8701 Astronaut Boulevard
Cape Canaveral, Florida  32920
Phone: 321-784-0000
 
Wednesday, February 6, 2008
Quality Inn – Stellar Conference Center
125 Venure Drive
Brunswick, Georgia  31525
Phone: 912-265-4600
 
Thursday, February 7, 2008
Sheraton New Bern
100 Middle Street
New Bern, North Carolina 28560
Phone: 252-638-3585
 
Wednesday, February 20, 2008
Hilton Garden Inn
5265 International Blvd.
North Charleston, South Carolina 29418
Phone: 843-308-9331
Council to Hold Series of Public Scoping Meetings in February

Topics include allocations, Annual Catch Limits, Limited Access Privilege Programs, and mackerel quotas

 

From Marathon to Manteo, fishermen who fish in federal waters along the South Atlantic coast should plan to attend one of a series of public scoping meetings/workshops being held by the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council in February.  These informal scoping meetings/workshops provide the public an opportunity to weigh in on several fisheries issues before the Council determines if management actions are warranted.

 

These issues include options for determining allocations of fisheries between recreational and commercial sectors, as well as allocations within these sectors.  For example, recreational allocations may be considered between for-hire (charter and headboats) and private recreational fishermen.  For the commercial sector, allocations may be considered based on gear types.  Other issues open for scoping include possible amendments to the Snapper Grouper Fishery Management Plan that will establish Annual Catch Limits for species undergoing overfishing as outlined in the reauthorized Magnuson Stevens Act.  These ACLs may lead to further restrictions on certain fisheries.  Additionally, the Council is soliciting public comment on the establishment of a Limited Access Privilege Program for the commercial snapper grouper fishery as well as input on the allocation of the commercial Atlantic king mackerel quota. 

 

While the Council has held public scoping meetings in the past, this series is unique in that several members of the Council staff and local Council representatives will be on hand to hold informal round table discussions in a workshop format, answer questions, and provide participants with information regarding the scoping topics and other issues addressed by the Council.  The meetings/workshops will be open from 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM and again from 6:00 PM until 8:00 PM.  Council staff and members will be available during these hours for informal discussions and members of the public can provide formal comments for Council consideration during these time periods. 

 

The Council is also accepting written comments on these issues until5:00 p.m. on February 22, 2008.  Copies of the public scoping documents with details on how to submit written comments on each topic are available by contacting the Council office and will be posted on the Council’s web site at www.safmc.net as they become available.  The scoping documents contain additional background information on these individual issues and will be helpful in preparing for the scoping meetings. 

 

The public is encouraged to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn first hand about current federal fisheries issues, discuss details with Council members and staff, and provide comments.  The information and recommendations provided by the public will be instrumental in determining the future course of fishery management decisions. 

 

 

South Atlantic Fishery Management Council

Public Scoping Meeting Dates and Locations

 

 

Monday, February 4, 2008

The Mutiny Hotel

2951 South Bayshore Drive

Coconut Grove, Florida  33133

Phone: 305-441-2100

 

Tuesday, February 5, 2008

Radisson Resort at the Port

8701 Astronaut Boulevard

Cape Canaveral, Florida  32920

Phone: 321-784-0000

 

Wednesday, February 6, 2008

Quality Inn – Stellar Conference Center

125 Venure Drive

Brunswick, Georgia  31525

Phone: 912-265-4600

 

Thursday, February 7, 2008

Sheraton New Bern

100 Middle Street

New Bern, North Carolina 28560

Phone: 252-638-3585

 

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Hilton Garden Inn

5265 International Blvd.

North Charleston, South Carolina 29418

Phone: 843-308-9331
Share this article

What is the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)?

The global conveyor belt, shown here, circulates cool subsurface water and warm surface water throughout the world. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation is part of this complex system of global ocean currents.)

The ocean’s water is constantly circulated by currents. Tidal currents occur close to shore and are influenced by the sun and moon. Surface currents are influenced by the wind. However, other, much slower currents that occur from the surface to the seafloor are driven by changes in the saltiness and ocean temperature, a process called thermohaline circulation. These currents are carried in a large “global conveyor belt,” which includes the AMOC.

AMOC stands for Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The AMOC circulates water from north to south and back in a long cycle within the Atlantic Ocean. This circulation brings warmth to various parts of the globe and also carries nutrients necessary to sustain ocean life.

Continue reading →

Read More

What is latitude?

Latitude lines start at the equator (0 degrees latitude) and run east and west, parallel to the equator. Lines of latitude are measured in degrees north or south of the equator to 90 degrees at the North or South poles.

Lines of latitude, also called parallels, are imaginary lines that divide the Earth. They run east to west, but measure your distance north or south. The equator is the most well known parallel. At 0 degrees latitude, it equally divides the Earth into the Northern and Southern hemispheres. From the equator, latitude increases as you travel north or south, reaching 90 degrees at each pole.

Continue reading →

Read More

What is longitude?

Lines of longitude, also called meridians, are imaginary lines that divide the Earth. They run north to south from pole to pole, but they measure the distance east or west. Longitude is measured in degrees, minutes, and seconds. Although latitude lines are alway equally spaced, longitude lines are furthest from each other at the equator and meet at the poles. A transcript is available that describes this infographic content in plain text. (Image credit: iStock)

Lines of longitude, also called meridians, are imaginary lines that divide the Earth. They run north to south from pole to pole, but they measure the distance east or west.

The prime meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England, has a longitude of 0 degrees. It divides the Earth into the eastern and western hemispheres. The antimeridian is on the opposite side of the Earth, at 180 degrees longitude. Though the antimeridian is the basis for the international date line, actual date and time zone boundaries are dependent on local laws. The international date line zigzags around borders near the antimeridian.

Continue reading →

Read More

What is a barrier island?

Satellite image of Cape Hatteras National Seashore on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Credit: NASA’s Earth Observatory.

Barrier islands form as waves repeatedly deposit sediment parallel to the shoreline. As wind and waves shift according to weather patterns and local geographic features, these islands constantly move, erode, and grow. They can even disappear entirely.

They are generally separated from the mainland by tidal creeks, bays, and lagoons. Beaches and sand dune systems form on the side of the island facing the ocean; the side facing the shore often contains marshes, tidal flats, and maritime forests. These areas are important habitat for seabirds, fish and shellfish, and and nesting sea turtles.

Continue reading →

Read More
Keep Reading