RE: FLOUNDER – COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS â€â€Å

RE:  FLOUNDER – COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS – ATLANTIC OCEAN

Dr. Louis B. Daniel III, Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 12:01 A.M., Saturday, March 1, 2008, the following restrictions shall apply to the commercial flounder fishery:

I. HARVEST LIMITS

During the period beginning at 12:01 A.M., Saturday, March 1, 2008 and ending at 6:00 P.M., Monday, March 31, 2008, no commercial fishing operation, regardless of the number of people involved, may have total landings of more than 6,000 pounds of flounder taken from the Atlantic Ocean.  These operations require a valid License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean.  The Atlantic Ocean flounder fishery will close immediately after the Director issues a public notice that the spring quota of flounder has been landed from the Atlantic Ocean, or at 6:00 P.M., March 31, 2008, whichever occurs first.

II. PERMITS

A. Finfish dealers may not buy more than 100 pounds of flounder per day per commercial fishing operation unless the dealer has a valid 2008 Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permit. Vessels landing more than 100 pounds of flounder per day from the Atlantic Ocean are required to possess a valid License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean from the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries.  Permits will be issued only to those licensed fish dealers holding a valid license as authorized in G.S. 113-169.3.   Dealers must abide by all conditions of the 2008 Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permit.

B. Dealers possessing a 2008 Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permit shall report daily by noon through FAX transmittal (252-726-3903) to the Division of Marine Fisheries flounder landings from the Atlantic Ocean for the previous day.

III. GENERAL INFORMATION

A. This proclamation is issued under the authority of N.C.G.S. 113-134; 113- 170.4; 113-170.5; 113-182; 113-221.1; 143B-289.52 and N.C. Marine Fisheries Rules 15A NCAC 3M .0503 and 3O. 0503.

B. It is unlawful to violate the provisions of any proclamation issued by the Fisheries Director under his delegated authority pursuant to N.C. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3H .0103.

C. The landing prohibition beginning at 6:00 P.M. on March  31, 2008 will allow the Division to review landing reports.  Landings for the second harvest period may be adjusted by proclamation if the winter quota of flounder has not been taken.

D. For the purposes of this proclamation, fish shall be considered landed when fish are unloaded or the vessel is tied to the dock, whichever occurs first. 

E. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3M .0503 (c) (1) states it is unlawful to land more than 100 pounds per trip of flounder taken from the Atlantic Ocean unless the vessel has been issued a North Carolina License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean.  This is in addition to the normally required licenses.

F. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3M .0503 (c) (2) specifies that it is unlawful for a fish dealer to purchase or off-load more than 100 pounds of flounder taken from the Atlantic Ocean by a vessel that has not first produced a valid North Carolina License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean.

G. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3I .0113 specifies that it is unlawful for any licensee under Chapter 113, Subchapter IV of the General Statutes to refuse to allow the Fisheries Director or his agents to obtain biological data, harvest information, or other statistical data necessary or useful to the conservation and management of marine and estuarine resources from fish in the licensee’s possession.

H. The intent of this proclamation is to establish trip limits and a reporting process for the taking of flounder from the Atlantic Ocean to assure that the spring, 2008 quota allocated to North Carolina in the joint Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council – Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fishery Management Plan for Summer Flounder is not exceeded.

I. Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permits are available at no cost from all Division of Marine Fisheries License Offices.

RE:  FLOUNDER – COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS – ATLANTIC OCEAN

Dr. Louis B. Daniel III, Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 12:01 A.M., Saturday, March 1, 2008, the following restrictions shall apply to the commercial flounder fishery:

I. HARVEST LIMITS

During the period beginning at 12:01 A.M., Saturday, March 1, 2008 and ending at 6:00 P.M., Monday, March 31, 2008, no commercial fishing operation, regardless of the number of people involved, may have total landings of more than 6,000 pounds of flounder taken from the Atlantic Ocean.  These operations require a valid License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean.  The Atlantic Ocean flounder fishery will close immediately after the Director issues a public notice that the spring quota of flounder has been landed from the Atlantic Ocean, or at 6:00 P.M., March 31, 2008, whichever occurs first.

II. PERMITS

A. Finfish dealers may not buy more than 100 pounds of flounder per day per commercial fishing operation unless the dealer has a valid 2008 Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permit. Vessels landing more than 100 pounds of flounder per day from the Atlantic Ocean are required to possess a valid License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean from the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries.  Permits will be issued only to those licensed fish dealers holding a valid license as authorized in G.S. 113-169.3.   Dealers must abide by all conditions of the 2008 Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permit.

B. Dealers possessing a 2008 Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permit shall report daily by noon through FAX transmittal (252-726-3903) to the Division of Marine Fisheries flounder landings from the Atlantic Ocean for the previous day.

III. GENERAL INFORMATION

A. This proclamation is issued under the authority of N.C.G.S. 113-134; 113- 170.4; 113-170.5; 113-182; 113-221.1; 143B-289.52 and N.C. Marine Fisheries Rules 15A NCAC 3M .0503 and 3O. 0503.

B. It is unlawful to violate the provisions of any proclamation issued by the Fisheries Director under his delegated authority pursuant to N.C. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3H .0103.

C. The landing prohibition beginning at 6:00 P.M. on March  31, 2008 will allow the Division to review landing reports.  Landings for the second harvest period may be adjusted by proclamation if the winter quota of flounder has not been taken.

D. For the purposes of this proclamation, fish shall be considered landed when fish are unloaded or the vessel is tied to the dock, whichever occurs first. 

E. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3M .0503 (c) (1) states it is unlawful to land more than 100 pounds per trip of flounder taken from the Atlantic Ocean unless the vessel has been issued a North Carolina License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean.  This is in addition to the normally required licenses.

F. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3M .0503 (c) (2) specifies that it is unlawful for a fish dealer to purchase or off-load more than 100 pounds of flounder taken from the Atlantic Ocean by a vessel that has not first produced a valid North Carolina License to Land Flounder from the Atlantic Ocean.

G. Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3I .0113 specifies that it is unlawful for any licensee under Chapter 113, Subchapter IV of the General Statutes to refuse to allow the Fisheries Director or his agents to obtain biological data, harvest information, or other statistical data necessary or useful to the conservation and management of marine and estuarine resources from fish in the licensee’s possession.

H. The intent of this proclamation is to establish trip limits and a reporting process for the taking of flounder from the Atlantic Ocean to assure that the spring, 2008 quota allocated to North Carolina in the joint Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council – Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fishery Management Plan for Summer Flounder is not exceeded.

I. Atlantic Ocean Flounder Dealer Permits are available at no cost from all Division of Marine Fisheries License Offices.

Share this article

What is the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)?

The global conveyor belt, shown here, circulates cool subsurface water and warm surface water throughout the world. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation is part of this complex system of global ocean currents.)

The ocean’s water is constantly circulated by currents. Tidal currents occur close to shore and are influenced by the sun and moon. Surface currents are influenced by the wind. However, other, much slower currents that occur from the surface to the seafloor are driven by changes in the saltiness and ocean temperature, a process called thermohaline circulation. These currents are carried in a large “global conveyor belt,” which includes the AMOC.

AMOC stands for Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The AMOC circulates water from north to south and back in a long cycle within the Atlantic Ocean. This circulation brings warmth to various parts of the globe and also carries nutrients necessary to sustain ocean life.

Continue reading →

Read More

What is latitude?

Latitude lines start at the equator (0 degrees latitude) and run east and west, parallel to the equator. Lines of latitude are measured in degrees north or south of the equator to 90 degrees at the North or South poles.

Lines of latitude, also called parallels, are imaginary lines that divide the Earth. They run east to west, but measure your distance north or south. The equator is the most well known parallel. At 0 degrees latitude, it equally divides the Earth into the Northern and Southern hemispheres. From the equator, latitude increases as you travel north or south, reaching 90 degrees at each pole.

Continue reading →

Read More

What is longitude?

Lines of longitude, also called meridians, are imaginary lines that divide the Earth. They run north to south from pole to pole, but they measure the distance east or west. Longitude is measured in degrees, minutes, and seconds. Although latitude lines are alway equally spaced, longitude lines are furthest from each other at the equator and meet at the poles. A transcript is available that describes this infographic content in plain text. (Image credit: iStock)

Lines of longitude, also called meridians, are imaginary lines that divide the Earth. They run north to south from pole to pole, but they measure the distance east or west.

The prime meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England, has a longitude of 0 degrees. It divides the Earth into the eastern and western hemispheres. The antimeridian is on the opposite side of the Earth, at 180 degrees longitude. Though the antimeridian is the basis for the international date line, actual date and time zone boundaries are dependent on local laws. The international date line zigzags around borders near the antimeridian.

Continue reading →

Read More

What is a barrier island?

Satellite image of Cape Hatteras National Seashore on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Credit: NASA’s Earth Observatory.

Barrier islands form as waves repeatedly deposit sediment parallel to the shoreline. As wind and waves shift according to weather patterns and local geographic features, these islands constantly move, erode, and grow. They can even disappear entirely.

They are generally separated from the mainland by tidal creeks, bays, and lagoons. Beaches and sand dune systems form on the side of the island facing the ocean; the side facing the shore often contains marshes, tidal flats, and maritime forests. These areas are important habitat for seabirds, fish and shellfish, and and nesting sea turtles.

Continue reading →

Read More
Keep Reading