South Atlantic Fishery Management Council to Hold Public Hearings on Snapper Gro

South Atlantic Fishery Management Council to Hold Public Hearings on Snapper Grouper Management Issues

 

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council will hold a series of 7 public hearings from November 2 through November 16, 2009 regarding three amendments to the Council’s Snapper Grouper Fishery Management Plan for the South Atlantic Region.  With the exception of a hearing scheduled in Newport News, Virginia on November 16, 2009, all hearings will be held from 3:00 PM until 7:00 PM.  The hearing scheduled for November 16th will begin at 6:00 PM.

 

Council staff will provide presentations on the various amendments and management alternatives currently under consideration and will be available to answer questions.  Area Council members will be on hand to accept public comment any time during the public hearing hours. 

 

The Council will accept written comments regarding the amendments from October 19, 2009 until 5:00 PM November 25, 2009.  Instructions for submitting written comments, including email addresses, will be included in the Public Hearing Documents.  Documents will be available on the Council’s Web site at www.safmc.net by October 19, 2009 or by contacting the Council office at 843/571-4366 or Toll Free 866/SAFM-10.

 

Amendments:

• Snapper Grouper Amendment 17A

Red snapper are currently undergoing overfishing and are overfished.  Amendment 17A establishes Annual Catch Limits (ACLs) and Accountability Measures (AMs) for red snapper, long term management measures to rebuild the red snapper stock, and a monitoring program for red snapper.  Management options include closure of the red snapper fishery plus alternatives for area closures for all snapper grouper fishing to address bycatch of red snapper, a permitted fishing zone, and various red snapper monitoring program alternatives.

 

• Snapper Grouper Amendment 17B

Establishment of ACLs and AMs for 9 remaining species in the snapper-grouper complex currently listed as undergoing overfishing.  Alternatives include a proposed deepwater closure, allocations for golden tilefish, aggregate ACLs for gag, black grouper and red grouper, and AMs to close fisheries once the ACL is met.

 

• Snapper Grouper Amendment 18

Additional measures are being considered for the snapper-grouper complex, including expansion of the management unit northward, limiting access for the golden tilefish fishery, measures for the black sea bass pot fishery, change in fishing year for golden tilefish, improvements in fisheries statistics, and designation of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) as necessary.

 

**********************

 

SAFMC Public Hearing Schedule

3:00 PM until 7:00 PM

*Meeting begins at 6:00 PM

 

Monday, November 2, 2009

Hilton Garden Inn Charleston Airport

5265 International Boulevard

North Charleston, South Carolina 29418

Phone: 843-308-9330

 

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Hilton New Bern Riverfront

100 Middle Street

New Bern, North Carolina  28562

Phone: 252-638-3585

 

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum

175 Bourne Avenue

Pooler, Georgia  31322

Phone: 912-748-8888

 

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Key Largo Grande

97000 Overseas Highway

Key Largo, Florida  33037

Phone: 305-852-5553

 

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Radisson Resort at the Port

8701 Astronaut Boulevard

Cape Canaveral, Florida  32920

Phone: 321-784-0000

 

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Crowne Plaza Jacksonville Riverfront

1201 Riverplace Boulevard

Jacksonville, Florida  32207

Phone: 904-396-8800

 

*November 16, 2009

Virginia Marine Resources Commission

2600 Washington Avenue, 3rd Floor

Newport News, VA 23607

Phone: 757/247-2200

South Atlantic Fishery Management Council to Hold Public Hearings on Snapper Grouper Management Issues

 

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council will hold a series of 7 public hearings from November 2 through November 16, 2009 regarding three amendments to the Council’s Snapper Grouper Fishery Management Plan for the South Atlantic Region.  With the exception of a hearing scheduled in Newport News, Virginia on November 16, 2009, all hearings will be held from 3:00 PM until 7:00 PM.  The hearing scheduled for November 16th will begin at 6:00 PM.

 

Council staff will provide presentations on the various amendments and management alternatives currently under consideration and will be available to answer questions.  Area Council members will be on hand to accept public comment any time during the public hearing hours. 

 

The Council will accept written comments regarding the amendments from October 19, 2009 until 5:00 PM November 25, 2009.  Instructions for submitting written comments, including email addresses, will be included in the Public Hearing Documents.  Documents will be available on the Council’s Web site at www.safmc.net by October 19, 2009 or by contacting the Council office at 843/571-4366 or Toll Free 866/SAFM-10.

 

Amendments:

• Snapper Grouper Amendment 17A

Red snapper are currently undergoing overfishing and are overfished.  Amendment 17A establishes Annual Catch Limits (ACLs) and Accountability Measures (AMs) for red snapper, long term management measures to rebuild the red snapper stock, and a monitoring program for red snapper.  Management options include closure of the red snapper fishery plus alternatives for area closures for all snapper grouper fishing to address bycatch of red snapper, a permitted fishing zone, and various red snapper monitoring program alternatives.

 

• Snapper Grouper Amendment 17B

Establishment of ACLs and AMs for 9 remaining species in the snapper-grouper complex currently listed as undergoing overfishing.  Alternatives include a proposed deepwater closure, allocations for golden tilefish, aggregate ACLs for gag, black grouper and red grouper, and AMs to close fisheries once the ACL is met.

 

• Snapper Grouper Amendment 18

Additional measures are being considered for the snapper-grouper complex, including expansion of the management unit northward, limiting access for the golden tilefish fishery, measures for the black sea bass pot fishery, change in fishing year for golden tilefish, improvements in fisheries statistics, and designation of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) as necessary.

 

**********************

 

SAFMC Public Hearing Schedule

3:00 PM until 7:00 PM

*Meeting begins at 6:00 PM

 

Monday, November 2, 2009

Hilton Garden Inn Charleston Airport

5265 International Boulevard

North Charleston, South Carolina 29418

Phone: 843-308-9330

 

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Hilton New Bern Riverfront

100 Middle Street

New Bern, North Carolina  28562

Phone: 252-638-3585

 

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum

175 Bourne Avenue

Pooler, Georgia  31322

Phone: 912-748-8888

 

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Key Largo Grande

97000 Overseas Highway

Key Largo, Florida  33037

Phone: 305-852-5553

 

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Radisson Resort at the Port

8701 Astronaut Boulevard

Cape Canaveral, Florida  32920

Phone: 321-784-0000

 

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Crowne Plaza Jacksonville Riverfront

1201 Riverplace Boulevard

Jacksonville, Florida  32207

Phone: 904-396-8800

 

*November 16, 2009

Virginia Marine Resources Commission

2600 Washington Avenue, 3rd Floor

Newport News, VA 23607

Phone: 757/247-2200

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