States Schedule Hearings on Black Drum Public Information Document

States Schedule Hearings on Black Drum Public Information Document

 

Arlington, VA – The States of New Jersey, Delaware, North Carolina and the Commonwealth of Virginia have scheduled their hearings to gather public comment on the Public Information Document (PID) to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Black Drum. The PID provides the public an opportunity to submit input on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission’s development of a Black Drum FMP.  Public comment is being solicited on changes observed in the fishery; actions to be taken in terms of management, enforcement, and research; and any other concerns about the resource or fishery. The dates, times, and locations of the scheduled meetings follow.

New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife
July 12, 2012; 7 PM
Galloway Township Branch of the
Atlantic County Library
306 East Jimmie Leeds Road
Galloway, New Jersey
Contact: Russ Allen at 609.748.2020

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control
June 12, 2012; 7 PM
DNREC Auditorium
89 Kings Highway
Dover, Delaware
Contact: Stewart Michels at 302.739.9914

Virginia Marine Resources Commission
July 10, 2012; 6 PM
VMRC Conference Room
2600 Washington Avenue, 4th Floor
Newport News, Virginia
Contact: Rob O’Reilly at 757.247.2248

North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries
July 9, 2012; 6 PM
Central District Office
5285 U.S. Highway 70 West
Morehead City, North Carolina
Contact: Chris Stewart at 910.796.7370

The Commission’s South Atlantic State-Federal Fisheries Management Board approved the PID to the Black Drum FMP for public review and comment in May. As the first step in the development of the FMP, the PID presents the current status of the fishery and resource, and solicits public input on all aspects of the fishery and the resource.  The FMP is being initiated in response to concern regarding significant increases in harvest in recent years and the fact that the fishery primarily targets juveniles. The Commission is also moving forward with conducting the first coastwide assessment of this species.

The assessment will be developed concurrently with the FMP to support establishment of the interstate management program

Fishermen and other interested groups are encouraged to provide input on the PID either by attending public hearings or providing written comments. The PID can be obtained via the Commission’s website at www.asmfc.org under Breaking News or by contacting the Commission at 703.842.0740. Public comment will be accepted until 5 PM (EST) on July 25, 2012 and should be forwarded to Danielle Chesky, FMP Coordinator, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, 1050 N. Highland St, Suite 200A-N, Arlington, VA 22201; 703.842.0741 (FAX) or at dc*****@as***.org (Subject line: Black Drum PID). For more information, please contact Danielle Chesky at dc*****@as***.org or 703.842.0740.

States Schedule Hearings on Black Drum Public Information Document

 

Arlington, VA – The States of New Jersey, Delaware, North Carolina and the Commonwealth of Virginia have scheduled their hearings to gather public comment on the Public Information Document (PID) to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Black Drum. The PID provides the public an opportunity to submit input on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission’s development of a Black Drum FMP.  Public comment is being solicited on changes observed in the fishery; actions to be taken in terms of management, enforcement, and research; and any other concerns about the resource or fishery. The dates, times, and locations of the scheduled meetings follow.

New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife

July 12, 2012; 7 PM

Galloway Township Branch of the

Atlantic County Library

306 East Jimmie Leeds Road

Galloway, New Jersey

Contact: Russ Allen at 609.748.2020

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control

June 12, 2012; 7 PM

DNREC Auditorium

89 Kings Highway

Dover, Delaware

Contact: Stewart Michels at 302.739.9914

Virginia Marine Resources Commission

July 10, 2012; 6 PM

VMRC Conference Room

2600 Washington Avenue, 4th Floor

Newport News, Virginia

Contact: Rob O’Reilly at 757.247.2248

North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries

July 9, 2012; 6 PM

Central District Office

5285 U.S. Highway 70 West

Morehead City, North Carolina

Contact: Chris Stewart at 910.796.7370

The Commission’s South Atlantic State-Federal Fisheries Management Board approved the PID to the Black Drum FMP for public review and comment in May. As the first step in the development of the FMP, the PID presents the current status of the fishery and resource, and solicits public input on all aspects of the fishery and the resource.  The FMP is being initiated in response to concern regarding significant increases in harvest in recent years and the fact that the fishery primarily targets juveniles. The Commission is also moving forward with conducting the first coastwide assessment of this species.

The assessment will be developed concurrently with the FMP to support establishment of the interstate management program

Fishermen and other interested groups are encouraged to provide input on the PID either by attending public hearings or providing written comments. The PID can be obtained via the Commission’s website at www.asmfc.org under Breaking News or by contacting the Commission at 703.842.0740. Public comment will be accepted until 5 PM (EST) on July 25, 2012 and should be forwarded to Danielle Chesky, FMP Coordinator, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, 1050 N. Highland St, Suite 200A-N, Arlington, VA 22201; 703.842.0741 (FAX) or at dc*****@as***.org (Subject line: Black Drum PID). For more information, please contact Danielle Chesky at dc*****@as***.org or 703.842.0740.

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